MSA

Management Science Associates Inc.

Electronic Vapor Trends

  • The electronic nicotine delivery category is continuously evolving and now includes both cig-a-likes and liquids/vapors/mods products
  • Measuring wholesale shipments to retail outlets, the majority of e-Vapor volume is sold through convenience stores, followed by tobacco outlets
  • Since Q4 2013, liquids have been gaining some traction, accounting for at least 10% of total e-vapor volume in recent periods
  • Through Q1 2014, the distribution of e-Vapor products increased to 42% of all retail outlets versus 30% year-ago
    • 62% of c-stores and 74% of tobacco outlets sell at least one e-Vapor product
    • Tobacco outlets have deeper penetration by product type than c-stores
  • There is jockeying for leading brand position by both major and smaller tobacco manufacturers to capture adult consumers’ initial interest and continued loyalty to their brands
  • Convenience retailers can grow e-Vapor volume by stocking these top selling products, as well as considering newer entrants with attributes that would have high appeal to adult consumers in this changing and expanding category

Click here to view the MSA study of wholesale shipments by channel, types and brands.

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e-Vapor Trends
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Part 5 - View graphic - "High Volume Southern Suburban" and "Full-Service Eastern" segments

Part 4 - View graphic - "Variety-type Northeast" and "Smaller Southern" segments

Part 3 - View graphic - "Urban Hispanic" and "Smaller Metro Cigarette Store" segments

Part 2 - details of "Traditional" and "Mom & Pop" segments

Part 1 - overview of the Independent C-store Study

“But I’m different!!!”….or are you?  Each convenience store owner or operator believes in his/her heart that his/her store is “different” from the independent store across the street or the chain store down the road.  The dynamics and variability of the convenience channel have indeed created an extremely diverse and fragmented trade-class.  But just how different, or similar, are you to other stores and what are the factors that drive differences in store performance? 

MSA, in collaboration with several major manufacturers, conducted a segmentation study to understand this 70,000+ independent-retailer universe.  This study revealed that eight distinct store-segments exist based on these factors. Many of these segments are nationally-represented, with several regional groups identified.  The segments are:

1.            National segment of “traditional” high-volume, full-service c-stores
2.            National cluster of low-volume, small-town “mom & pop” type stores
3.            Urban Hispanic segment on both coasts
4.            Smaller metro cigarette stores
5.            Smaller variety-type stores found heavily in the northeast
6.            Smaller stores with a focus on snuff/chew and confections in the south
7.            Extremely high-volume, suburban stores in the southeast
8.            Large, high-volume, full-service stores in the northeast & Rust Belt

Read more to learn about the characteristics of the stores in the High-Volume Southeast Suburban and Full-Service Eastern segments.  Do either of these two segments describe your store(s)?  

More MSA articles: Click here.

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C-store Segmentation
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Courtesty of MSA

Part 4 - View graphic - "Variety-Type and Small Southern" segments

Part 3 - View graphic - "Urban Hispanic and Smaller Metro Cigarette Store" segments

Part 2 - details of "Traditional" and "Mom & Pop" segments

Part 1 - overview of the Independent C-store Study

“But I’m different!!!”….or are you?  Each convenience store owner or operator believes in his/her heart that his/her store is “different” from the independent store across the street or the chain store down the road.  The dynamics and variability of the convenience channel have indeed created an extremely diverse and fragmented trade-class.  But just how different, or similar, are you to other stores and what are the factors that drive differences in store performance? 

MSA, in collaboration with several major manufacturers, conducted a segmentation study to understand this 70,000+ independent-retailer universe.  This study revealed that eight distinct store-segments exist based on these factors. Many of these segments are nationally-represented, with several regional groups identified.  The segments are:

1.            National segment of “traditional” high-volume, full-service c-stores
2.            National cluster of low-volume, small-town “mom & pop” type stores
3.            Urban Hispanic segment on both coasts
4.            Smaller metro cigarette stores
5.            Smaller variety-type stores found heavily in the northeast
6.            Smaller stores with a focus on snuff/chew and confections in the south
7.            Extremely high-volume, suburban stores in the southeast
8.            Large, high-volume, full-service stores in the northeast & Rust Belt

Read more to learn about the characteristics of the stores in the Variety and Smaller Southern segments.  Do either of these two segments describe your store(s)?  

Check back for upcoming details about the characteristics of the remaining two segments.

More MSA articles: Click here.

Channel: 
Image: 
Caption: 
C-store Segmentation
Image Credit: 
Courtesty of MSA

Part 3 - View graphic - "Urban Hispanic and Smaller Metro Cigarette Store" segments

Part 2 - details of "traditional" and "mom & pop" segments

Part 1 - overview of the Independent C-store Study

“But I’m different!!!”….or are you?  Each convenience store owner or operator believes in his/her heart that his/her store is “different” from the independent store across the street or the chain store down the road.  The dynamics and variability of the convenience channel have indeed created an extremely diverse and fragmented trade-class.  But just how different, or similar, are you to other stores and what are the factors that drive differences in store performance? 

MSA, in collaboration with several major manufacturers, conducted a segmentation study to understand this 70,000+ independent-retailer universe.  This study revealed that eight distinct store-segments exist based on these factors. Many of these segments are nationally-represented, with several regional groups identified.  The segments are:

1.            National segment of “traditional” high-volume, full-service c-stores
2.            National cluster of low-volume, small-town “mom & pop” type stores
3.            Urban Hispanic segment on both coasts
4.            Smaller metro cigarette stores
5.            Smaller variety-type stores found heavily in the northeast
6.            Smaller stores with a focus on snuff/chew and confections in the south
7.            Extremely high-volume, suburban stores in the southeast
8.            Large, high-volume, full-service stores in the northeast & Rust Belt

Read more to learn about the characteristics of the Urban Hispanic and Smaller Metro Cigarette Store segments.  Do either of these two segments describe your store(s)?  

Check back for upcoming details about the characteristics of each segment.

More MSA articles: Click here.

Channel: 
Image: 
Caption: 
C-store Segmentation
Image Credit: 
Courtesty of MSA

Part 2 - details of "traditional" and "mom & pop" segments

Part 1 - overview of the Independent C-store Study

“But I’m different!!!”….or are you?  Each convenience store owner or operator believes in his/her heart that his/her store is “different” from the independent store across the street or the chain store down the road.  The dynamics and variability of the convenience channel have indeed created an extremely diverse and fragmented trade-class.  But just how different, or similar, are you to other stores and what are the factors that drive differences in store performance? 

MSA, in collaboration with several major manufacturers, conducted a segmentation study to understand this 70,000+ independent-retailer universe.  This study revealed that eight distinct store-segments exist based on these factors. Many of these segments are nationally-represented, with several regional groups identified.  The segments are:

1.            National segment of “traditional” high-volume, full-service c-stores
2.            National cluster of low-volume, small-town “mom & pop” type stores
3.            Urban Hispanic segment on both coasts
4.            Smaller metro cigarette stores
5.            Smaller variety-type stores found heavily in the northeast
6.            Smaller stores with a focus on snuff/chew and confections in the south
7.            Extremely high-volume, suburban stores in the southeast
8.            Large, high-volume, full-service stores in the northeast & Rust Belt

Part 2 shows the characteristics of the “traditional” high volume and “mom & pop” segments.  Do either of these two segments describe your store(s)?  

Check back for upcoming details about the characteristics of each segment.

More MSA articles: Click here.

Channel: 
Image: 
Caption: 
C-store Segmentation
Image Credit: 
Courtesty of MSA

Click to view the first of the eight segments identified by the Independent C-store Study

“But I’m different!!!”….or are you?  Each convenience store owner or operator believes in his/her heart that his/her store is “different” from the independent store across the street or the chain store down the road.  The dynamics and variability of the convenience channel have indeed created an extremely diverse and fragmented trade-class.  But just how different, or similar, are you to other stores and what are the factors that drive differences in store performance? 

Which segment describes your store(s)?  Read more here to see a summary of these eight segments, and stay tuned for upcoming updates to learn more about the characteristics of each segment.

More MSA articles: Click here.

Channel: 
Image: 
Caption: 
C-store Segmentation
Image Credit: 
Courtesty of MSA

Click to view cciPanel shopper insights-Part 2

The Convenience Consumer Insights Panel (cciPanel), a first-of-its-kind mobile research panel from Management Science Associates and Paradigm Sample, was designed to capture purchase-decision and attitudinal information among convenience store shoppers, including the millennial segment most likely to shop the channel.

cciPanel examined the recent market baskets among 18+ year old shoppers between April and September, 2012. Among 5,000 recent trips to convenience stores, 78% trips were made to chain stores, 17% to non-chain stores and 5% were unsure of store type.

In this Part 2 of shopper insights about non-chain convenience store visits, we learn:

  • Approximately 6 in 10 trips were made by shoppers employed outside the home.  Retailers should differentiate their store so that it becomes the destination for these in-transit visits to fulfill shoppers’ convenience needs.
  • While the majority of visits to C-stores occurred between the typical working hours of 9am and 5pm, retailers should offer special promotions to increase foot traffic and buyers during slower day parts, such as reduced price or combination deals on packaged beverages, salty snacks and confections.
  • Buyers who made last-minute stops spent less than buyers who planned their trips. Retailers should utilize outdoor signage and social media to drive more traffic inside the store and place impulse items in high traffic areas to increase dollars per trip.

More MSA articles: Click here.

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C-store Shopper Behavior
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