First Look at Next Week's Weather: April 27-May 3

Warming trend in Plains, interior regions; cooler in Northeast, Great Lakes

Published in CSP Daily News

weather trends week of April 27, 2014

BERWYN, Pa. -- Seasonal demand opportunities will be focused in the Southeast, Plains and interior regions of the United States next week as temperatures begin to rise, while the Northeast, Great Lakes and West Coast will trend cooler than last year, limiting demand, according to projections by Planalytics, the Berwyn, Pa.-based business weather intelligence firm.

For reference, next week last year, the U.S. was warmer than normal with above-normal rain and snow. Canada had its warmest end to April since 2001 with the least precipitation since 1989.

Here's a look at what to expect this year:

  • Next week this year, seasonal demand opportunities are highly regional. The strongest opportunities are in the Plains and interior regions, as well as the Southeast, where temperatures are expected to trend warmer than last year and warmer than normal. Demand for seasonal items will continue to perform well in these areas.
  • Cool temperatures are expected in the Northeast and Great Lakes. While periods of warmth are likely, the week will trend cooler than last year in the major markets of the Northeast and Great Lakes. Spring seasonal demand will subside in these areas following strong lifts this week. Midweek rain is likely along the East Coast.
  • Severe weather activity will continue, focus areas include the Central Plains and Ohio Valley, which are under threat for thunderstorms and high winds.
  • The Northwest remains stuck in a cool, wet pattern. More rain is likely for the Pacific Northwest, maintaining demand for rainwear and wiper blades.
  • The Southwest remains cooler than last year. Cooler temperatures than last year in the Desert Southwest and Southwest Coast will keep seasonal demand soft for much of the week.
  • Snow has melted in major markets in Ontario and Quebec, but systems continue to produce minor snow amounts along the U.S.-Canada border.